BIOSAFETY CONCERNS AND GM CROPS DISCUSSED AT PAU-FEB-16

By Punjab Agricultural University on 16 Feb 2018 | read
    020

PUNJAB AGRICULTURAL UNIVERSITY

 

BIOSAFETY CONCERNS AND GM CROPS DISCUSSED AT PAU

 

LUDHIANA, FEBRUARY 16

 

A one-day state level “Biosafety Capacity Building Workshop” was jointly organized by the Punjab Agricultural University (PAU) and the Biotech Consortium India Limited (BCIL), New Delhi, today. The workshop was supported and facilitated by the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP)/Global Environment Facility (GEF) Supported Phase II Capacity Building Project on Biosafety; Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change (MoEFCC); Government of India. More than 100 delegates participated in the workshop. A technical session on “Biosafety: Regulatory Framework and Capacity Building Initiatives” was chaired by Dr Parveen Chhuneja, Director, School of Agricultural Biotechnology (SAB), PAU, whereas, the technical session on the “Status of Research and Development in Punjab” was chaired by Dr S.S. Banga, ICAR National Professor, Department of Plant Breeding and Genetics, PAU.

            A keynote speaker, Dr K.C. Bansal, Former Director, National Bureau of Plant Genetic Resources, said “Earlier we had Green Revolution technologies, today we have biotechnology, which is an extension of traditional plant breeding.” Speaking on the topic “Biosafety Regulations and GM Crops: An Update,” Dr Bansal referred to several traits of GM crops in India. Having resistance to viral, fungal and bacterial diseases, GM crops could tackle malnutrition, he observed. “As per the global area of biotech crops (2016), three developing countries including Brazil, Argentina and India (especially biotech cotton) grew 91 per cent of biotech crops. India was the largest exporter of cotton in 2016 with Bt cotton cultivated on a large scale,” he divulged. Acquainting the farmers with GM mustard hybrid, he said it will give benefits to Punjab farmers just as Bt cotton has given. Biosafety concerns have been expressed in agriculture, he said, while promoting new breeding technologies which are precise, science-based and have high speed.

Dr Chhuneja said PAU has been engaged in biotechnology research for the last 25 years. New wheat varieties, Unnat PBW 343 and Unnat PBW 550 have been developed by PAU using biotechnological approaches and are the first to be released in India, she added.

            Dr Vibha Ahuja, Chief General Manager, BCIL, welcomed the eminent scientists, researchers and the farmers of Punjab. She delivered her talk on “Science and Safety Aspects of GM Crops.” Dr Sonia Kaushik, Assistant Manager, BCIL, coordinated the programme.

Scientists, namely Dr Prabhjeet Singh, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar; Dr Siddharth Tiwari, Plant Molecular Biology and Genetic Engineering National Agri-Food Biotechnology Institute; Dr J.S. Sandhu and Dr Prashant Mohanpuria, SAB, PAU; gave presentations on research initiatives in agri-biotechnology in Punjab.

            At the workshop, other speakers who gave presentations included Dr S.J. Rahman, Member of Review Committee on Genetic Manipulation; Dr Ajit Dua, Chief Executive Officer, Punjab Biotechnology Incubator; and Dr Murali Krishna, Joint Director, MoEFCC.   


PAU STUDENT GETS BEST PRESENTER AWARD

AT INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM

 

LUDHIANA, FEBRUARY 16:

 

Four Ph. D scholars, namely Manisha Verma, Sundar Lingam, Sheipra Saklani and Sloney Sachar from the College of Home Science,Punjab Agricultural University (PAU), participated in the 6th International Agriculture Students Symposium (IASS), held at the University Putra Malaysia, Malaysia, from February 4-13. Ms Manisha Verma, s student of the Department of Food and Nutrition, has been awarded the “Best Presenter Award” for her research paper “A comparative study on the nutritional evaluation of organically and conventionally grown cereals and legumes.” The paper has been authored by Ms Manisha Verma, Dr Neerja Singla and Dr Charanjit Singh Aulakh, Director, School of Organic Farming, PAU. She is also a recipient of UGC-Junior Research Fellowship for her doctoral research under the guidance of Dr Neerja Singla, Assistant Scientist, Food and Nutrition. Dr Baldev Singh Dhillon, Vice-Chancellor, PAU, congratulated and appreciated the efforts made by the team. Dr Jatinder Gulati, Dean, College of Home Science, and Dr Anita Kochhar, Head, Department of Food and Nutrition, lauded the PAU student and wished her all success in future.

 

 

 

WHEAT AT HEADING STAGE IDEAL FOR KARNAL BUNT MANAGEMENT: PAU

 

LUDHIANA, FEBRUARY 16;

 

Karnal bunt (KB), a fungal disease of wheat, is known to partially transform the wheat gains into black mass of fungal spores. The disease perpetuates through seed as well as soil. Giving this information, Dr P.S. Sekhon Head, Department of Plant Pathology, PAU, said that during the last year, the disease appeared in low to moderate form in all the districts of the state. The number of Karnal bunt infected samples were high in the districts of Mohali,  Ropar, Pathankot,  Hoshiarpur, Amritsar and Fatehgarh Sahib, he revealed. So there is enough inoculum present in the fields for the infection of the wheat crop under cultivation, he added. Dr Sekhon further said that in all the wheat varieties except HD 3086, heading stage appears after 90-92 days of sowing which is ideal for the infection of the disease. Spore of fungus laying at soil surface germinates and produces infection threads which infect the young florets more severely, he added.  The prevailing weather conditions due to cloudiness and intermittent rains in the past have led to high humidity and favourable temperature in the atmosphere which is conducive for the infection of Karnal Bunt, he cautioned. Dr Sekhon appealed to the farmers that heading is ideal stage to spray the crop with Tilt 25 EC or Folicur 25 EC @ 200 ml in 200 litres of water per acre in order to raise disease free healthy seed crop. He further clarified that when complete ear emergence has occurred, then efficacy of recommended spray is very poor.

Dr Sekhon also told that the performance of newly recommended PAU varieties namely PBW 725, PBW 667 and HD 3087 is very good and during the last season, they gave 2-3 quintal more yield than the old variety HD 2967. Therefore, it is the right time when efforts should be made to reduce inoculum load of Karnal bunt on these newly released varieties.

 

 

e

--
PUNJAB AGRICULTURAL UNIVERSITY BIOSAFETY CONCERNS AND GM CROPS DISCUSSED AT PAU LUDHIANA, FEBRUARY 16 A one-day state level “Biosafety CapacityBuilding Workshop” wasjointly organized by the Punjab Agricultural University (PAU) and the Biotech Consortium India Limited (BCIL), New Delhi, today. The workshop was supported and facilitated by the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP)/Global Environment Facility (GEF) Supported Phase II Capacity Building Project on Biosafety; Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change (MoEFCC); Government of India. More than 100 delegates participated in the workshop.A technical session on “Biosafety: Regulatory Framework and Capacity Building Initiatives” was chaired byDr Parveen Chhuneja, Director, School of Agricultural Biotechnology (SAB), PAU, whereas, the technical session on the “Status of Research and Development in Punjab” was chaired by Dr S.S. Banga, ICAR National Professor, Department of Plant Breeding and Genetics, PAU. A keynote speaker, Dr K.C. Bansal, Former Director, National Bureau of Plant Genetic Resources, said “Earlier we had Green Revolution technologies, today we have biotechnology, which is an extension of traditional plant breeding.” Speaking on the topic “Biosafety Regulationsand GM Crops: An Update,” Dr Bansal referred to several traits of GM crops in India. Having resistance to viral, fungal and bacterial diseases, GM crops could tackle malnutrition, he observed. “As per the global area of biotech crops (2016), three developing countries including Brazil, Argentina and India (especially biotech cotton) grew 91 per cent ofbiotech crops. India was the largest exporter of cotton in 2016 with Bt cotton cultivated on a large scale,” he divulged. Acquainting the farmers with GM mustard hybrid, he said it will give benefits to Punjabfarmers just as Bt cotton has given. Biosafety concerns have been expressed in agriculture, he said, while promoting new breeding technologies which are precise, science-based and have high speed. Dr Chhuneja said PAU has been engaged in biotechnology research for the last25 years. New wheat varieties, Unnat PBW 343 and Unnat PBW 550 have been developed by PAU using biotechnological approaches and are the first to be released in India, she added. Dr Vibha Ahuja, Chief General Manager, BCIL, welcomed the eminent scientists, researchers and the farmers of Punjab. She delivered her talk on “Science and Safety Aspects of GM Crops.” Dr Sonia Kaushik, Assistant Manager, BCIL, coordinated the programme. Scientists, namely Dr Prabhjeet Singh, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar; Dr Siddharth Tiwari, Plant Molecular Biology and Genetic Engineering National Agri-Food BiotechnologyInstitute; Dr J.S. Sandhu and Dr Prashant Mohanpuria, SAB, PAU; gave presentations on research initiatives in agri-biotechnology in Punjab. At the workshop, other speakers who gave presentations included Dr S.J. Rahman, Member ofReview Committee onGenetic Manipulation; Dr Ajit Dua, Chief Executive Officer, Punjab Biotechnology Incubator; and Dr Murali Krishna, Joint Director, MoEFCC.PAU STUDENT GETS BEST PRESENTER AWARD AT INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM LUDHIANA, FEBRUARY 16: Four Ph. D scholars, namely ManishaVerma, Sundar Lingam, Sheipra Saklani and Sloney Sachar from the College of Home Science,Punjab Agricultural University (PAU), participated in the 6th International Agriculture Students Symposium (IASS), held at the University Putra Malaysia, Malaysia, from February 4-13. Ms Manisha Verma, s student of the Department of Food and Nutrition, has been awarded the “Best Presenter Award” for her research paper “A comparative study on the nutritional evaluation of organically and conventionally grown cereals and legumes.” The paper has been authored by Ms Manisha Verma, Dr Neerja Singla and Dr Charanjit Singh Aulakh, Director, School of Organic Farming, PAU. She is also a recipient of UGC-Junior Research Fellowship for her doctoral research under the guidance of Dr Neerja Singla, Assistant Scientist, Food and Nutrition. Dr Baldev Singh Dhillon, Vice-Chancellor, PAU, congratulated and appreciated the efforts made by the team. Dr Jatinder Gulati, Dean, College of Home Science, and Dr Anita Kochhar, Head, Department of Food and Nutrition, lauded the PAU student and wished her all success in future. WHEAT AT HEADING STAGE IDEAL FOR KARNAL BUNT MANAGEMENT: PAU LUDHIANA, FEBRUARY 16; Karnal bunt (KB), a fungal disease of wheat, is known to partially transform the wheat gains into black mass of fungal spores. The disease perpetuates through seed as well as soil. Giving this information, Dr P.S. Sekhon Head, Department of Plant Pathology, PAU, said that during thelast year, the disease appeared in lowto moderate form in all the districts of the state. The number of Karnal bunt infected samples were high in the districts of Mohali, Ropar, Pathankot, Hoshiarpur, Amritsar and Fatehgarh Sahib, he revealed. So there is enough inoculum present in the fields for the infection of the wheat crop under cultivation, he added. Dr Sekhon further said that in all the wheat varieties except HD 3086, heading stage appears after 90-92 days of sowing which is ideal for the infection of the disease. Spore of fungus laying at soil surface germinates and produces infection threads which infect the young florets more severely, he added. The prevailing weather conditions due to cloudiness and intermittent rains in the past have led to high humidity and favourable temperature in the atmosphere which is conducive for the infection of Karnal Bunt, he cautioned. Dr Sekhon appealed to the farmers that heading is ideal stage to spray the crop with Tilt 25 EC or Folicur 25 EC @ 200 ml in 200 litres of water per acre in order to raise disease free healthy seed crop. He further clarified that when complete ear emergence has occurred, then efficacy of recommended spray is very poor. Dr Sekhon also told that the performance of newly recommended PAU varieties namely PBW725, PBW667and HD 3087 is very good and during the last season, they gave 2-3 quintal more yield than the old variety HD 2967. Therefore, it is the right timewhen efforts should be made to reduce inoculum load ofKarnal bunt on these newly released varieties.

 

Comments