A Cake Of Jaggery, Fish Can Make Plants Healthy

By TheHindu on 09 Jul 2015 | read
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Billampadavu Narayana Bhat has preserved seeds of many local varieties of vegetables such as that of Mangalore okra.—PHOTO: RAVIPRASAD KAMILAA cake made out of jaggery and fish can make plants healthier, according to an agriculturist. The cake should be dissolved in the prescribed quantity of water by making thick and light solution. Thick solution should be applied to weak plants and light one to others, he said.

Billampadavu Narayana Bhat, a prominent vegetable grower and seed collector near Vitla in Dakshina Kannada, said that he was applying the solution for the past three years for getting better yield. People in urban area can apply the solution to vegetables grown in terraces or on the premises of homes. The cake is not available in market. One has to prepare it at home easily.

How to make the cake?

It is simple. Mix 2 kg of jaggery to 2 kg of fish in a vessel or in a plastic jar. Close it in an airtight container and keep it for 22 days. Open it only on the 23rd day. The cake is ready.

“Can you imagine the cake will smell like jasmine. If you think it will emanate foul smell you are wrong,” he said. Mr. Bhat said that if plants were weak then mix the cake with 100 litres of water and apply the solution. If plants were not weak, then mix the cake in 200 litres of water and apply the solution. It would make weak plants healthier and healthy plants to yield more. “The solution works like a tonic,” he said. The solution could be applied to any crop. Fish catch in the city which would go waste and rot could be used for making the cake. He spells out the secret of sowing seeds. Seeds should not be sown on the full moon day or days closer to the full moon day. As there would be moonlight, grasshoppers will be active. When seeds sprout, insects attack and destroy the seeds. Mr. Bhat said that seeds should be sown closer to the new moon day when there is no moonlight.

Referring to terrace gardening, Rajendra Hegde, Director, Garden City Farmers' Association, Bangalore, went on record at a workshop recently that coconut water acted as a rich nutrient to plants. They did attract ants.

If people could tolerate ants, they could feed plants with coconut water.

 

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